Like us on Facebook

Whiskeys From Around the World

World Whisky Day 2021 is coming!

Did you know the word “whiskey” is not an English word? It’s derived from the original Gaelic ‘uisge beatha’ and dates back to the 15th century in Ireland and Scotland. The original Gaelic word translates to “water of life” Just as the word itself has evolved over time so has the production and the whiskey itself. For World Whisky Day, learn more about this fine tipple below!

Credits: benraigoza.tumblr.com

Whiskey or Whisky? 

Whiskey is the common word for liquor. Products manufactured in Scotland, Canada and Japan are named ‘whisky’ without an ‘e’, and so buffs can get opinionated about the slight disparity in the word’s spelling. American and Irish whiskey is written including the ‘e’. 

Indeed, whiskey is no longer just a Kentucky and Tennessee item in America, that also it would not be just a Scottish and Irish product abroad. In fact, this drink has become a global phenomenon, with nations from nearly every continent manufacturing at least one competent product. Let’s have a look at some of the whiskeys around the world this World Whisky Day.

Irish Whiskey

Irish whiskey typically has a milder flavour than other classes of whiskey. It is produced from a mash of malt, and it is distilled using water and caramel colouring, and it must be aged in a wooden cask for a minimum of three years. The end product is a whiskey that’s smooth to sip neat or on the rocks, although Irish whiskey also makes excellent cocktails.

Credits: liquor.com

Jameson Irish Whiskey

Jameson is an iconic brand around the world, and is one of the top-selling labels and most famous Irish whiskey brands. Seriously, try to find a bottle shop anywhere in the world that doesn’t stock Jameson. However, what’s remarkable is the steady tier of quality and drinkability handed over by the label’s flagship statement, despite its large scale mass manufacturing.

Scotch Whisky

Scotch whisky or Scotch hails from Scotland and is made from either grain or malt base. The Scots consider their whiskey-making a point of national pride and have rules and regulations in place to protect that reputation that distillers must obey. The spirit must be kept in an oak drum for at least three years. Also, each bottle must provide an age report which shows the youngest aged whisky adopted to prepare that blend. This is a whisky to sip neat—it makes an exquisite after-dinner drink.

Credit: liquor.com

Johnnie Walker

Johnnie Walker was produced from an experiment – its creator John Walker pushed the edges of what whiskey could be. Not happy with the harsh, incompatible scotch of his day, he fused various single malts to develop a steady, complex and flavourful whisky with the result that now every bottle skillfully blends the most exceptional and rarest whiskies from Scotland. This exclusive blend has reached every nook and corner of the world, making Johnnie Walker the first-ever universal whisky brand.

Japanese Whisky

Comparatively late to the game than Irish and Scotch whiskies, Japanese whisky has followed the Scotch traditional method of distilling and grain choice along with their own twist. Japanese whiskies are well known for their high standards of quality and generally come as single malts or blends, and are often enjoyed in cocktails or with a splash of soda.

Credits: whisky.suntory.com

Suntory Whisky Toki

Suntory Toki is an ideal Japanese whisky. Toki means “time”, it’s a relatively young brew using whiskies from three of Suntory’s distilleries, Yamazaki, Chita and Hakushu – the Chita being a grain whisky distillery, which has contributed some great single grains of late. Toki has a contrasting composition, Hibiki, as its major ingredients are Hakushu single malt and Chita grain whisky. It should certainly go well in a highball with lemon and soda.

Canadian Whisky

Like scotch whisky, Canadian whisky must be barrel-aged for a minimum period of three years. It’s milder and smoother than other kinds of whiskies because it incorporates a significant percentage of corn. You will notice that most Canadian whiskies are produced from rye and corn, but others may be made out of wheat or barley.

Credits: luxe.digital

Fireball Cinnamon Whisky

Fireball Cinnamon Whisky is one of the most famous whiskies in the USA. The liquor was first made in the 1980s, and over the years, it gradually became prominent in Canada and outside the nation. When it was initially made, Fireball was one of Seagram’s certain flavoured schnapps liquors. 

The strongly spiced flavour of Fireball is warming and delicious! Fortunately, you can prepare so many exceptional mixed drinks with Fireball that you will have tons of choices to choose from. Try adding a shot of Fireball in a pint of your favoured hard cider for a great cinnamon taste.

Now that you know the basics of different whiskeys of the world, you are ready to raise your glass to say cheers to World Whisky Day.

Subscribe to our newsletter

Shoot down to your nearest local store

Store: